Saleh Kamel In His Own Words

“When I have an idea, I become totally focused on breathing life into it. It is rewarding to see things fall into place and poised for success but I have noticed that is also when my focus changes and I begin to look for new opportunities.”

Saleh Kamel

“All the jobs where Allah has best helped me succeed were based on a need of my own or that of the community.”

Saleh Kamel

“When I was working for the government, I was well placed to witness the development boom taking off in Saudi Arabia. The early stages of urban renaissance and infrastructural projects were evident everywhere… I desperately hoped that one day, Saudi companies and institutions would replace foreign entities, and their gains and profits would be incorporated into our national economy.”

Saleh Kamel

“The process known as ‘Saudisation’, which calls for replacing foreign workers with Saudi nationals, was gaining traction at the time and becoming a very popular policy. Decision-makers in Riyadh desperately wanted to see a local firm emerge that was capable of competing with, and beating, the big foreign names, but not all were convinced the time was right for Dallah.”

Saleh Kamel

“I am happy and satisfied with what I have done with no regrets, but there are always projects that I consider more important, for love or other personal reasons, regardless of profit or loss.”

Saleh Kamel

“Wealth must not be merely a factor for individual advancement, but rather a lever for achieving community balance and harmony.”

Saleh Kamel

“Each person knows in their heart what is right and what is wrong. Our faith -– whatever that faith might be – has taught us morals more real than any offered up by the so-called market experts.”

Saleh Kamel

“Some may be surprised when they hear me say that I owe as much to the failures in my life as I do to the successes. The patience Allah bestowed upon me after every failure was a reason to hold fast and not collapse in the middle of the road. One should not be ashamed of one’s failures. There is nothing wrong with failure; what is wrong is to repeat the same mistake twice.”

Saleh Kamel

“Although the Arab world has many rivers, it does not grow enough wheat or rice. We have all the natural and human resources, not only to be self-sufficient but to be the world’s food basket, yet we are not. How does this make sense?”

Saleh Kamel

“I told Mrs Merkel: ‘In Islamic finance, we operate and believe in the real economy, not the hypothetical economy in which most of the world’s banks operate. She said: ‘Tell me more.’ I explained the Hadith: ‘Do not sell what you do not own! If this Hadith had been followed, no bank would have gone bankrupt, no individual would have been financially broken. The Chancellor asked me to elaborate, which I happily did. Two months later, Chancellor Angela Merkel telephoned me to say: ‘Do not sell what you do not own’ is now the law in Germany!” 

Saleh Kamel

“I have been in love with the media industry since I was a young man . . . what began  as a schoolboy hobby would follow me in various guises most of my life.”

Saleh Kamel

“When it was first confirmed I would launch a private TV channel, a famous Arab newspaper mocked me in an article, implying the move was an extravagant ruse to show off.  They later realised their mistake and, as one commentator put it,  ‘were forced to eat their words’.”

Saleh Kamel

“Of course, I took a risk but there can be no reward without doing so. The whole essence of Islamic economics is based on a spirit of adventure. If you want to profit, you must also be prepared to take the risk of suffering a loss.”

Saleh Kamel

“Looking back, there were so many ups and downs (at ART), mayhem became almost commonplace; anyone who believes owning a television channel is just a matter of accumulating vast revenues could not be further from the truth.”

Saleh Kamel

“Every business owner should be aware that giving employment to people is the reason Allah bestowed wealth on them. If we remembered this and acted upon it, there would be no unemployment in our societies.”

Saleh Kamel

“How can we Saudise our workforce if culturally we look down on essential jobs? All occupations are honourable and vital to our society. If your car breaks down on a desert highway, you pray the next car along will be driven by a mechanic, not a heart surgeon.”

Saleh Kamel

“Lead by example. Before expecting your children to be dutiful, you must first fulfil your responsibilities towards them. Be fair and tender, treat your children in a good way that will help to establish a healthy, loving relationship. “The fact that a father is head of the household, the person who supports his family financially, does not give him the right to treat his children unfairly or cruelly.”

Saleh Kamel